The CPS: Love, hate and expectations(1)

20 Oct
2012

The CPS: Love, hate and expectations(1)

The Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties , also known as the CPS, is a big, blue book that has been published in Canada for the past 42 years by the Canadian Pharmacists Association (CPhA). Is it a credible source of drug information or a collection of biased pharmaceutical company promotions?

To answer this question, the raison d’etre of the CPS will be examined. A need had been identified for a single source of information that described the indications, adverse effects, dosing instructions and related information about pharmaceuticals available on the Canadian market. Such a reference would make it easier for doctors, pharmacists, nurses and other health care practitioners to find information about the drugs that they were prescribing, dispensing and administering to their patients. The first edition, published in 1960 by the CPhA and edited by F Norman Hughes , Dean of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto, Ontario, put an end to trying to save and file all those pieces of paper that may have been with the pill bottle, were offered by the sales representatives or were mailed by the company. In addition to the monographs of pharmaceutical specialties, it contained a manufacturers index (yellow section), and a therapeutic and pharmacological index (pink section). It was a good idea. It really caught on and became too big a job for just one person. The CPhA volunteered to take over the onerous job of editing and publishing the collection of monographs. Dean Hughes chaired a committee of experts to provide advice on the publication in the form of an editorial advisory panel. buy flovent inhaler

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