Colorectal, Breast, and Prostate Cancers in Medicaid

25 Dec
2009

breast neoplasms

BACKGROUND

Of the lung, colon, breast, and prostate accounted for 54% of all 1998 cancer deaths in Maryland, compared with 52.7% of all 1998 cancer deaths in the United States. Disparities in cancer stage, treatment intensity, and mortality between blacks and whites are well-documented; however, there is a paucity of data examining racial disparities in similarly insured, low-income populations. Previous authors have postulated that low socioeconomic status is a stronger predictor of cancer outcome than race. A recent study by Sung et al. showed that in rural Georgia, differences between whites and blacks in prevalence rates for cervical carcinoma mostly disappeared in the Medicaid population, a population of homogenous economic status. However, the disparities persisted among Medicaid enrollees in urban Georgia. We examined prevalence rates between whites and blacks for cancers of the lung, colorectum, breast, and prostate in a population of Maryland Medicaid recipients, an economically homogenous group. We also explored the potential reasons for differing patterns of racial disparities across regions.

If the disparities in prevalence rates between whites and blacks can be attributed to socioeconomic status, then disparities between whites and blacks should be largely eliminated after adjusting for socioeconomic status. Thus, our hypothesis is that disparities between whites and blacks should be largely eliminated in Maryland Medicaid, a homogenous group in terms of socioeconomic status. canadian pharmacy generic viagra

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